Home  |  Contact  

Email:

Password:

Sign Up Now!

Forgot your password?

DESENMASCARANDO LAS FALSAS DOCTRINAS
 
What’s New
  Join Now
  Message Board 
  Image Gallery 
 Files and Documents 
 Polls and Test 
  List of Participants
 YHWH (DIOS PADRE) EL UNICO DIOS 
 JESUCRISTO NUESTRO MESIAS JUDIO 
 LOS DIEZ MANDAMIENTOS DE LA BIBLIA 
 MEJORE SU CARACTER Y SU VIDA 
 YOU TUBE-MAOR BA OLAM-LINKS 
 YOU TUBE-MAOR BA OLAM-LINKS II 
 BIBLIAS/CONCORDANCIA/LIBROS 
 MAYOR ENEMIGO DEL HOMBRE ES UNO MISMO 
 ¿LA TORA ES MACHISTA? -MENSAJE ESOTERICO Y EXOTERICO 
 ¿ES INMORTAL EL ALMA?- FALACIA DE LA ENCARNACION Y REENCARNACION 
 EL ISLAM TIENE ORIGEN UNITARIO ADOPCIONISTA 
 ANTIGUO TESTAMENTO-ESTUDIO POR VERSICULOS 
 NUEVO TESTAMENTO-ESTUDIOS POR VERSICULOS 
 NUEVO TESTAMENTO II-ESTUDIOS POR VERSICULOS 
 NUEVO TESTAMENTO III-ESTUDIOS POR VERSICULOS 
 CRISTO NO TUVO PREEXISTENCIA 
 ¿QUE ES EL ESPIRITU SANTO? 
 
 
  Tools
 
NEXO ISLAMICO CON LA BIBLIA: ISLAMIC CALENDAR AND FEASTS
Choose another message board
Previous subject  Next subject
Reply  Message 1 of 5 on the subject 
From: BARILOCHENSE6999  (Original message) Sent: 27/01/2013 00:40

Islamic Calendar and Feasts

Allah - Muslim name for God

The Islamic Lunar Calendar:

  • The Islamic calendar is strictly lunar, in contrast to the Gregorian/Western calendar (which is mainly solar), or the Hebrew calendar (a luni-solar hybrid).
  • The Islamic year consists of 12 months, each of which can have either 29 or 30 days, with a total of either 354 or 355 days per year:
    • According to long-standing Islamic tradition, each month begins on the day when the first sliver of the new moon is first observed (looking West, just after sunset); thus, the full moon is always on the 14th or 15th day of each month.
      • In contrast, the Gregorian/Western "months" are not tied to the moon's phases; a new moon or full moon might fall on any day of the "month."
    • An issue hotly debated among Muslims today is whether the new moon must literally be observed with the naked eye, or whether one can use astronomical calculations to determine the beginning of each month, and thus the entire calendar, far in advance:
      • Most Muslims believe that the traditional methods should be maintained, that the crescent moon must literally be observed for a new month to begin after 29 days (or else a 30th day is added to the old month), because that is what the Qur'an commands and/or ancient Muslim traditions have always done.
      • Other Muslims propose that it would not be against Islamic beliefs to calculate the beginning of each new month in advance mathematically/astronomically.
    • Since the moon requires about 29½ days to orbit the earth, each month on the Islamic calendar could be either 29 or 30 days long.
      • In contrast, the length of each month on the Gregorian/Western calendar is fixed: April, June, Sept, and Nov always have 30 days; Jan, March, May, July, Aug, Oct, and Dec always have 31 days; only February varies, having 28 days most years, but 29 days in leap years.
    • Since 12 lunar rotations require exactly 354 and 11/30 days, each Islamic year (12 months) has a total of either 354 or 355 days;
      • In contrast, the Gregorian/Western year normally has 365 days, but is lengthened to 366 days in leap years (every fourth year, with a few exceptions).
  • With either 354 or 355 days, each Islamic calendar year is 10 or 11 days shorter than the 365¼-day solar year of the Gregorian/Western calendar; thus, every 32 years on the Gregorian/Western calendar corresponds to 33 years on the Islamic calendar.
    • Unlike the Hebrew "luni-solar" calendar, the Islamic lunar calendar does not add a "leap month" every few years to keep the lunar and solar calendars in sync.
    • As a consequence, the four seasons rotate through the various months of the Islamic year; each month eventually occurs in all four seasons within a cycle of 32 Western or 33 Islamic years; in other words; the Islamic "New Year" may be in October one year, but in July eight years later, in April eight years after that, already in January in another eight years, but occurs again in October either years later, at the end of the full 32/33 cycle.

Year and Dates on the Islamic Calendar:

  • Year One on the Islamic calendar was fixed as the year of the Hijrah, when Mohammad and his followers moved from Makka to Madinah, in 622 AD.
    • More precisely, the first day of the first month of the Islamic year one corresponds to July 26, 622, the very day they left Makka.
  • Due to the strictly lunar nature of the Islamic calendar (as explained in the first section above), all fixed dates on this calendar occur 10 or 11 days earlier in subsequent years on the Western calendar. For example, the following table shows how the first day of Ramadan has shifted in recent years:
Islamic Year: 1416 1417 1418 1419 1420 1421 1422 1423 1424 1425 1426 1427 1428
Western Date: 21-Jan-96 10-Jan-97 31-Dec-97 20-Dec-98 9-Dec-99 27-Nov-00 16-Nov-01 6-Nov-02 26-Oct-03 15-Oct-04 4-Oct-05 23-Sep-06 12-Sep-07
  • Islamic dates are often indicated with AH, an abbreviation for the Latin anno hegirae ("Year of the Hegira").
    • This is similar to how Gregorian/Western years are traditionally designated AD, which comes from the Latin anno Domini ("Year of the Lord").
  • To roughly convert an Islamic year (AH) to the equivalent Gregorian year (AD), or vice versa, one can use the following formulas:
    • AD = 622 + (32/33 x AH)
    • AH = 33/32 x (AD – 622)

The Twelve Islamic Months:

  • Ramadan, the ninth month, is considered the most important or holiest month, a time of fasting (see the "Pillars of Islamic Practice").
  • The Hajj, the annual pilgrimage to Makka, takes place from the 8th to 10th days of the twelfth month, Dhu al-Hijjah.
  • The Arabic names of the twelve months of the Islamic calendar:
1) Muharram   2) Safar 3) Rabi' al-awwal 4) Rabi' al-thani  5) Jumada al-awwal 6) Jumada al-thani
7) Rajab 8) Sha'aban   9) Ramadan 10) Shawwal 11) Dhu al-Qi'dah 12) Dhu al-Hijjah

Islamic Feasts and Commemorations:

  • Some Muslims believe that they should celebrate only two festivals annually: Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha.
    • The strictest Muslims do not even celebrate their own birthdays, or the anniversaries of any other events.
    • Other Muslims (esp. Shi'ites) add several more feasts and commemorations, as detailed below.
  • Eid al-Fitr, the "Feast of Breaking the Fast" (1st of Shawwal)
    • It is celebrated immediately after the end of the annual month of fasting (Ramadan, the ninth month); thus it falls on the first day of the tenth month.
    • Festivities include special meals and the exchange of gifts among family and friends.
  • Eid al-Adha, the "Feast of the Sacrifice" (10th of Dhu al-Hijjah)
    • It commemorates the sacrifice of Abraham, when he nearly sacrificed his son (Ishmael in Islamic tradition, in contrast to Isaac in the Hebrew Bible), but killed a ram instead.
    • It is celebrated at the end of the Hajj, the annual pilgrimage to Makka; Muslims who are attending the Hajj perform certain rituals on this day.
    • Muslims throughout the rest of the world also celebrate with special meals and exchanging gifts among family and friends.
  • Other Feasts and Holidays - celebrated or commemorated by some Muslims (esp. Shi'ites), but not all:
    • Islamic New Year (1st day of Muharram)
    • Day of Ashura (10th day of Muharram) - Muslim "Day of Atonement"; for Sunnis, a voluntary fast; for Shi'is, the most important holy day, commemorating the martyrdom of Imam Husayn ibn Ali (Hussein, son of Ali, grandson of the prophet Muhammad).
    • Mawlid or Milad al-nabi (12th day of Rabi' al-awwal, the third month) - commemorates the "Birthday of the Prophet" Muhammad.
    • Laylat al-mi'raj (27th night of Rajab, the seventh month) - commemorates the miraculous "Night Journey" of the Prophet from Makka to Jerusalem, and his ascension into heaven (see Qur'an 17.1).
    • Laylat al-bara'a (14th night of Sha'ban, the eighth month) - Muslim "Day of the Dead" in South and SE Asia; also the eve of the birthday of the Twelfth Imam of the Twelver Shi'is.
    • Laylat al-qadr, the "Night of Power" (between the 26th and 27th of Ramadan) - commemorates the night in which Muslims believe the Qur'an was first revealed to Muhammad.

 


Overview of Islam | Pillars of Belief & Practice | Muhammad & History | Qur'an & Hadiths | Calendar & Feasts | Glossary



Anuncios:

First  Previous  2 to 5 of 5  Next   Last  
Reply  Message 2 of 5 on the subject 
From: BARILOCHENSE6999 Sent: 07/02/2014 18:00

Calendario musulmán

De Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre
 

El calendario musulmán o islámico es un calendario lunar.

Se basa en ciclos lunares de 30 años (360 lunaciones, de tradición sumeria). Los 30 años del ciclo se dividen en 19 años de 354 días y 11 años de 355 días. Los años de 354 días se llaman años simples y se dividen en seis meses de 30 días y otros seis meses de 29 días. Los años de 355 días se llaman intercalares y se dividen en siete meses de 30 días y otros cinco de 29 días. Años y meses van alternándose. Es decir, cada 33 años musulmanes equivalen a 32 años gregorianos. Las intercalaciones se hacen añadiendo un día al final del mes de du l-hiyya en los años 2º, 5º, 7º, 10º, 13º, 16º, 18º, 21º, 24º, 26º y 29º de cada ciclo de 30 años.

El origen de este calendario es el día del inicio de la Hégira, que es 1 A.H. (Anno Hegirae). En el calendario gregoriano correspondería al 16 de julio de 622.

El día 15 de noviembre de 2014 coincidirá con el 1 de muharram, primer día del año hegiriano 1437, cuyo último día 30 de du l-hiyya coincidirá con el 4 de noviembre de 2015.[1]

El actual año islámico es 1436 AH. En el calendario gregoriano 1436 AH va desde aproximadamente el 14 de noviembre de 2013 (por la tarde) al 4 de noviembre de 2014 (por la tarde).

Actualmente, en los países musulmanes conviven el calendario gregoriano y el musulmán (33 años civiles gregorianos equivalen a 34 islámicos). La fecha islámica correspondiente a la gregoriana se puede calcular con un error máximo de un día al multiplicar el año musulmán por 0.970224 y añadir 621.5774.

 

 

Los días de la semana[editar · editar código]

Los días de la semana son siete:

  • al-áhad (الأحد «el primero»), domingo
  • al-ithnáyn (الاثنين «el segundo»), lunes
  • al-thalatha (الثلاثاء «el tercero»), martes
  • al-arba‘a (الأربعاء «el cuarto»), miércoles
  • al-jamís (الخميس «el quinto»), jueves
  • al-yuma‘a (الجمعة «la reunión»), viernes. Se llama así porque es el día festivo, en que se realiza la oración colectiva en las mezquitas.
  • as-sabt (السبت «el sábat»), sábado

Los meses[editar · editar código]

Los meses son doce:

  1. Muharram
  2. Safar
  3. Rabi' al-Awwal
  4. Rabi' al-Thani
  5. Yumada al-Wula
  6. Yumada al-Thania
  7. Rayab
  8. Sha'abán
  9. Ramadán
  10. Shawwal
  11. Du al-Qa'da
  12. Du al-Hiyya

Particularidades[editar · editar código]

El día musulmán comienza con la caída del sol, y el mes empieza unos dos días después de la luna nueva, cuando comienza a verse el creciente lunar.

Si consideramos la diferencia de días entre el calendario lunar y el solar, y el hecho de comenzar el año 622, nos daremos cuenta de la dificultad de establecer una correspondencia entre el calendario musulmán y el gregoriano. Existen tablas de correspondencia de años,[2] pero para un cálculo rápido y exacto sirven las siguientes fórmulas:

  • Para pasar del año musulmán al gregoriano:

(1) G=H+622-{frac  {H}{33}}

  • Para pasar del año gregoriano al musulmán:

(2) H=1,03125(G-622)

Donde:

G = año gregoriano

H = año musulmán (hégira)

Estas fórmulas sirven para establecer la correspondencia entre los años musulmanes y los gregorianos pero establecer la correspondencia exacta de una fecha concreta es casi imposible, e incluso los historiadores admiten un error de un día más o menos. La causa de este desfase es que el inicio y el fin de cada mes se regula según el ciclo lunar observable, lo que lleva a introducir un día de más cuando las observaciones no coinciden con el cálculo teórico.

Véase también[editar · editar código]

 
http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calendario_musulm%C3%A1n

Reply  Message 3 of 5 on the subject 
From: BARILOCHENSE6999 Sent: 07/02/2014 18:56
 
LA BOMBA TIRADA EN ALAMOGORDO TIENE RELACION CON LA HEGIRA DE LOS MUSULMANES (COMIENZO DEL CALENDARIO MUSULMAN=16 DE JULIO DEL 622)-EL CALENDARIO MUSULMAN ES EXCLUSIVAMENTE LUNAR (NO LUNI-SOLAR), OSEA DE 354/355 DIAS, Y EN ESTE MARCO SE IGUALA AL GREGORIANO CADA 33 AÑOS
 

Hégira

De Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre
 
Mapa de la Hégira y otras anteriores migraciones musulmanas.

Hégira (en árabe hiyra هِجْرَة) indica el traslado de Mahoma. Es la emigración de los musulmanes de La Meca a Medina, ocurrida en el año 622 de la era cristiana. Dicho evento marca en el mundo islámico el primer año. Los musulmanes toman desde el año 632 d. C. el primer día del año lunar en el que se produjo (16 de julio de 622) como referencia para su calendario. El término, por extensión, se aplica a cualquier fuga o emigración semejante. En el año 639 d. C., el califa Umar señaló el año de la Hégira como el primero de la era musulmana. En consecuencia, el 622 d. C. se convirtió en el 1 AH (anno hegirae, ‘año de la Hégira’) en el calendario musulmán.

La palabra hiyra significa literalmente «migración», y no «huida», como por error se traduce a veces.

 

 

Calendario musulmán[editar · editar código]

Dado que el calendario musulmán cuenta por años lunares de 354 días, 8h, 48m y 38 s, 33 años suyos equivalen a 32 años solares y 4 días, 18h y 48m. Sin embargo, intercala también 11 años de 355 días en cada ciclo de 30 años.

La conversión de los años musulmanes a la era cristiana se realiza sumando 621, si el año de la hégira no pasa de 32. Si pasa de 32, se lo divide por 33, se resta el cociente al año dado y se le suma 622 al resultado.

Para la conversión inversa, cuando el año sea menor de 641, se restará 621; si está entre el 641 y 653 se restará 620, y si pasa de 653, se restará 621, dividiendo el resultado por 33 y añadiendo al cociente el dividendo obtendremos el año de la Hégira (o alguna vez el siguiente).

 
http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/H%C3%A9gira

Reply  Message 4 of 5 on the subject 
From: BARILOCHENSE6999 Sent: 13/03/2014 04:14

Reply  Message 5 of 5 on the subject 
From: BARILOCHENSE6999 Sent: 13/03/2014 04:16
Este tatuaje en forma de serpiente posiblemente represente al llamado "Dragón de los nodos lunares" o al calendario musulmán. La figura contiene 29 círculos. Pueden representar a los 29 días que (como número entero) tarda la Luna en cumplir su ciclo de fases, su ciclo sinódico. También, 29 puede ser años, que es el ciclo del calendario musulmán compuesto por 11 periodos de 355 días y 19 periodos d...e 354 días (en 355 días la Luna cumple exactamente 13 órbitas a la Tierra o ciclos sidéreos, y en 354 días cumple exactamente 12 ciclos de fases o ciclos sinódicos; además la cifra 355 reducida es 3+5+5 = 13, y la cifra 354 da 12, datos aportados por Alada Blanco Dorado).

Así, 11 ciclos de 355 días son 3.905 días que son 10,7 años; y 19 ciclos de 354 días son 6.726 días que son 18,4 años. En total son 10,7 + 18,4 = 29,1 años. De hecho, contando círculos desde la cola hasta el círculo central hay una cadena de 19 círculos cuyos tamaños aumentan respecto al anterior. Y desde el círculo central hasta el otro extremo hay una cadena de 11 círculos. El círculo central puede representar a la Tierra que estaría en el centro de otro círculo grande que representaría a la órbita de la Luna, la cual estaría situada en sendos nodos lunares del "Dragón" que atraviesa el centro del círculo en el que está la Tierra, centro cósmico desde el cual vemos a la luna y los musulmanes observan a la luna para determinar la dinámica de su calendario. Durante 29,1 años la Luna cumple 360 ciclos de fases (sinódicos)
Ver más
 
 
 
 
 
  •  
  •  

Anuncios:

First  Previous  2 a 5 de 5  Next   Last  
Previous subject  Next subject
 
©2020 - Gabitos - All rights reserved